Tag Archives: Microblogging

Beware what you say online | Corporate blogging news digest

A cautionary tale stuck out this week – one that warned against posting negative comments on social networks that even tangentially relate to your job.  James Andrews, a VP at a PR agency visited a client in Memphis and posted a derogatory Tweet about the town. The client found out and all hell broke lose.

As new technologies continue to redefine the role of corporate communications, PR specialists may find themselves becoming important educators for others around the organization. Whether it be conversing on corporate blogs, Twitter, LinkedIn, Facebook or any one of the growing legion of social networks, employees can have a significant effect on the value of the brand they represent and need to understand how to ensure their communication is beneficial.

Twitter is growing in prominence this year, and we’re seeing more and more advice on how to make the most of this medium.

News highlights

To what degree has traditional media embraced blogging?
Looking primarily at sports journalism, Benkoo offers a potted history of blogging and the wary eye traditional media has cast on this new upstart medium. Seems odd looking back on this now given the great many journalist blogs that exist out there.

Corporate blogs: can you spot the difference between personal posts and corporate posts
As more and more companies start using their blogs for official communications, it can be difficult to spot which posts are the official company line, and which are personal opinions of employees. At some point large corporate blog networks may be forced to take the same segmented approach used in the newspaper business: separating opinion from ‘hard news’. The difference here may be that the opinion takes the prime spot.

Top Delicious articles on blogging and online writing
He Blogs, She Blogs compiles a list of their top bookmarks, including tips on gaining RSS subscriptions and this excellent lighthearted look at writing for Twitter.

Beware of the false sense of obscurity: posting on social media sites
Scout Blogging picks up on a negative client-related tweet from a PR agency VP and offers caution about posting negative comments on social networks: you never know who is listening.

The 3 Stages of Twitter Acceptance
A short post, but in my humble experience this is right on. At first you really can’t see the point, but once you go full circle and get sucked in, that’s it.

IBM on Twitter: build relationships and share knowledge in and outside the enterprise
Interesting take on a Twitter corporate strategy:
“While the company never embarked on an official Twitter strategy, the result is consistent with IBM’s long term strategy for social media: to take a smaller centralized corporate presence in lieu of enabling all employees to engage on their own as part of their jobs in the platforms of their choice.”

Pushing out blog posts across social media – the Duct Tape Marketing approach
If you run a corporate blog, there are some great examples here of how you can automatically distribute your content across different networks (Twitter, Facebook, Delicious, Stumble). I should point out that to compile this weekly digest, I use the Delicious bookmarking tool. The Delicious feed is picked up by Friendfeed, which drops all the content into Twitter. It sounds more complicated than it is, and now it is set up, it’s a real time-saver.

See the effect of your corporate blogging/social media efforts
Spy aggregates content from a number of social media sources into one ever-growing stream. But beware, if you pick the right topic, the constantly updating stream can be riveting.

Need to redesign your blog? Check out these tips from ProBlogger
Using the digital Photography School site as an example, ProBlogger go through the stages involved in redesigning the site, including 7-10 days of WordPress development (which seems a little on the high side).

Corporate blogging and the Gartner Hype Cycle
Webworx Factory cites that according to the Gartner Hype Cycle, corporate blogging was in the trough of disillusionment during 2008. Slope of enlightenment is the next step. Will we see this in 2009?

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Social networking budgets on the increase | Corporate blogging news digest

This week I want to highlight a report from eMarketer that reports small businesses intending to spend 25% more on social networking in 2009 than they did in 2008.

Perhaps more of this segment’s audience now uses these tools (another report this week states 35% of adults are members of a social network). Perhaps small businesses now understand more about this area. Either way, a glimmer of hope in the currently gloomy economic environment.

News highlights

HP’s Tac Anderson talks about social media tactics including corporate blogging
Some good tips from HPs social media evangelist, such as think about your target audience and build content appropriately.
“If your customers are CXO’s (CEO, CIO, CFO, CMO) then the reason you have a blog is because the two most influential factors to a CXO’s decision making process are the Two G’s: Google and Gartner. Google is speaking to the importance of all search and Gartner is speaking to the importance that analysts play. Blogs are great for reaching both. There’s no lower bang for your buck tactic to reach the two G’s than having a high quality blog.”

Google uses corporate blogs to announce cutbacks
The medium is the messsage here, rather than the story. Google has for some time been using its blogs to release information about the company that would normally have come from a press release. Will more companies start doing following suit?

Tools for monitoring blogs and other sites: Social Media Explorer
SEO Toolbar for Firefox gives you a good indication of how a blog (or any website) is ranked by Google in particular and the web in general. Go ahead, check yourself out.

Most influential advertising, marketing and media blogs – Advertising Age
The Power 150 list of the top blogs. You’ll find some choice reading on these sites. Trend data on the blogs also available here.

Adult participation in social networks now at 35 percent
This number has raised more than 300% over the last 3 years, according to research by Pew Research.

Corporate blogging: think about presentation as well as content
Design being such a subjective thing, I’m not sure I agree with all the changes recommended in this blog makeover, however there are some good points such as including a photo to make the blog more personable and organizing posts by categories.

HP study shows humans will pursue status over wealth
A report by social computing scientists at HP labs looks into what degree we will go to to obtain social status. Their findings? We will go as far as to give up monetary rewards, if we think we can gain status. Is this what powers participation in social networks?

GSK and Centocor Abandon Their Pioneering Corporate Drug Blogs
Citing the fact that these were personality-led blogs where the personalities concerned left the company, GSK has stopped updating its AlliConnect blog and the Johnson & Johnson-owned Centocor has let its CNTO411 blog wane. Both companies continue blogging in other parts of the organization.

Tips on blogging content from Your PR Guy
Focus on the stories that are most useful to your client base: success stories, problem solution stories and testimonials. These tips are aimed primarily at small businesses but should be considered by any corporate bloggers.

Social networking budgets on the increase according to eMarketer
Small businesses are expecting to spend more on social networking than on any other form of digital marketing over the coming year. Significantly, most of this group does not blog and apparently isn’t about to start.

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When social networks talk: Friendfeed now linking to Twitter

Friendfeed, the aggregating social network now has an interesting feature: if you use Twitter, you can automatically post your Friendfeed activity as Tweets.

Friendfeed is ideal for pulling together all your updates on Flickr, Del.icio.us, Flickr or other online social networks. Twitter is rapidly becoming the de facto service for letting the world know what you are up to and has a network far exceeding that of Friendfeed (just check out Google Trends). Tying these two services together provides a great opportunity to broadcast the updates you make to your social networking accounts.

It works something like this:

To set this up, go into your Friendfeed account settings and at the bottom of the page you will see the ‘Feed Publishing’ options. Select the “Post my FriendFeed entries on Twitter” option and enter your Twitter account details. That’s pretty much it.

I have to say that in some respects, this service could be seen as a necessary fight for survival for Friendfeed. Like the video wars of the early ‘Eighties, there is only really enough space for one player in the market (if you recall, VHS took the lead and effectively eradicated Betamax). As users we suffer fatigue, and really don’t want to be tied to too many competing services. Friendfeed does have some advantages over Twitter in terms of its aggregation possibilities and the recently-updated interface, but Twitter, and the micro-blogging revolution it is fueling is definitely stealing the limelight. In effect, Friendfeed could be construed as being another one of the API services available to Twitter.

In case you are new to either of these services, here’s some tutorials to help explain how they work:

Friendfeed explained

Twitter explained

The touchy subject of CEOs blogging

Mario Sundar once again picks up on the subject of CEOs blogging. Will this issue ever be put to sleep? I doubt it. Why? I’d suggest there are just way too many variables involved. It is like asking should you have long hair? (OK, perhaps a dodgy analogy, but it is late on Friday, and hopefully you get my point).

Some things to consider:

  • Is the CEO remotely interested in blogging?
  • Is there a viable topic with an audience behind it? (if you sell carpets in the Boondocks, then I’d suggest not)
  • Does the CEO have the time, whatever that may be?
  • Can the CEO really write? (I know from experience this is by no means a prerequisite for leading a company)
  • Is the company setup to deal with the feedback that can come from a CEO blogging?

I’d probably lean towards saying that it is a good thing for a CEO to blog. One thing that could be more realistic and useful in many cases is a CEO microblogging. It is more lightweight, yet could still be interesting for employees, investors, customers, etc.

Read Mario’s orginal post